Requiring an ID is Reasonable

According to liberals, the way to prevent the people you don’t like from voting is as easy as requiring they show photo identification before they vote. Of course, you might use that same tactic if you’re combating voter fraud, but let’s not get bogged down in details. A new bill (H351) is expected to be filed this week which will require voters to present a photo id before casting their ballot. At a public comment session at the House, Bob Hall, executive director for Democracy N.C., called it “as phony as a three-dollar bill. It’s a sham. It’s a political trick.” He also stated that “it puts up new barriers for young people.” Another speaker reminded representatives and attendees that in North Carolina a picture ID is required to drive, smoke, fly, drink, cash a check, buy insurance and get a job.

Those opposed to the bill overlook conservatives statements that it will help eliminate voter fraud by instead claiming it is either not a problem or not really happening. However, voting fraud happens more often then realized, as shown in the last election and the blatant disregard ACORN showed for the law.

Just take a look at how easy it is to register to vote. You may remember the many students filling the Pit and surrounding area last fall with applications on hand. Stop for a minute, fill out some information and you’re on your way to casting an illegal ballot, without anyone verifying that you have the right to vote. Not everyone does. Visitors to our country, holders of green cards, illegal aliens and anyone convicted of a felony do not have the right to vote in an election. In North Carolina all you have to do to register is fill out a form with some basic information (which may not be verified) and then attest to these following five things:

  • I am a U.S. citizen.
  • I will have been a resident of North Carolina and this county for 30 days before the election.
  • I will be at least 18 years old by the next general election.
  • I am not registered nor will I vote in any other county or state.
  • If I have been convicted of a felony, my rights of citizenship have been restored.

A person determined to vote regardless won’t let something like perjury stop them. The requirement to prove your identity is nothing new. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, eight states already require that photo identification be shown to vote. Note that this is to vote in person; if you’ve properly registered, you can still obtain an absentee ballot. Out of the remaining forty-two, another 19 require that some form of identification be required, not specifically a photo identification.

Our left-slanted daily newspaper made it sound like out-of-state students would be inconvenienced and discriminated against by a requirement to show photo identification. However, it’s unlikely. What is expected is that the language of the bill will indicate a government-issued ID (driver’s license, state ID, military ID, possibly passport) or public university student ID be required. And should a state ID or driver’s license be required, UNC students are smart enough to figure out how to get one. It costs all of $10 and other than standing in line, doesn’t take long. As an out-of-state student, I have no problem getting an ID from North Carolina. In fact, it might just help make my case for in-state-tuition. But more importantly, it will help to eliminate votes that are illegitimately cast.

2 comments

  1. "voting fraud happens more often then realized"

    There's no evidence that this is the case, which perhaps you realize because you don't cite any evidence…

  2. The primary means of voter fraud is the absentee ballot and this bill does absolutely nothing to address fraud via the absentee ballot. Furthermore, since there are statistics on fraudulently cast votes, that means there's already a system in place for identifying it. Preventing the 250-some votes distributed across the state that had to be nullified isn't worth the 1,000,0000 votes that won't be cast thanks for Voter ID.

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