CRDaily

BSM Week: A Dialouge

It is Black Student Movement week (BSM), and specifically, BSM Pride Day.

On the front of all the BSM shirts you see around there are the letters “B” (in black to represent “the people”), “S” (in red to represent blood), and an “M” (in green to represent the earth). The imagery evoked is undeniably pagan.

There is also a slogan on the front: “Freedom Through Revolution.” If I don’t miss my mark, that sounds an awful lot like Marxist rhetoric.

On the back there is a quote: “No force on Earth can stop the forward march of a determined, conscious, organized, vigilant and united movement.” Below that is the picture of a black-power fist. These are, to me, thinly veiled threats.

Now, I talked with some nice people at the BSM table in the pit. I talked with B’anca Glenn, the BSM president, and Claudia Parker, the treasurer. I also discussed relevant issues with other members of the BSM. And, I am not saying that they are all Marxist pagans, but they are all race-centric. That is simply a fact. Their mission statement dedicates them to “black values.” The president admitted so proudly.

The BSM, when I talked to them, claimed to be an “inclusive” and “progressive” organization. I explained how I saw that the use of the black fist and the expression of such violent terms such as “revolution” as a sign of silly refusal to accept the reality that is modern America, not sign-posts of outreach.

During the discussion I said I would attend a meeting of the BSM and discuss these things further with them. We shall see what comes of that next week.

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3 replies »

  1. Black Student Movement is race-centric? You don't say.

    I'm a white guy, but if having "black values" means you think black folks should have equal rights and be free from prejudice, then you could say I have black values. And proudly.

    In regards to the rhetoric of "forward march," do you deny that equal rights for African-Americans represents a "forward march," historically speaking? Appealing to the idea of revolution and the symbol of the black-power fist, do seem to me to be a bit outdated, as I wouldn't say "revolution" aptly describes anything going on right now. (Where do you get the idea that "freedom" and "revolution" are exclusively Marxist ideas? Ever heard of the "American Revolution"?) The black-power fist is just a symbol of the movement from early days; its best to think of the fist as a way of denoting a kinship with earlier activists.

    Where do your ideas of what black, red, and green come from? Did a member of BSM provide you with that insight, or are you just making it up? Is the black color of the title "Carolina Review Daily" also meant to evoke the idea of "black people"?

  2. "I'm a white guy, but if having "black values" means you think black folks should have equal rights and be free from prejudice, then you could say I have black values. And proudly."

    But you're conception of black values isn't what the BSM espouses. If it were merely equal rights and free from prejudice, then why would something like a separate Black Cultural Center be necessary? Or affirmative action?

  3. Ben, buddy, I don't even know where to begin. Firstly, I don't get how you jump from "black values" to equality under the law.

    Secondly, "do you deny that equal rights for African-Americans represents a 'forward march' historically speaking" is a stupid question considering you know me. Of course it does, that is not within the context of my point.

    Thirdly, I never said "revolution" was exclusively Marxist ("freedom" most certainly ain't), I said "If I don't miss my mark . . ." meaning that is the feeling I get after one, reading their mission statement, two talking to them, and three reading their slogan and quote of the week.

    Fourthly, they just straight up told me about the colors.

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